People discussions

People - water, sanitation and health at the 8th World Water Forum

Access to drinking water and basic sanitation is an essential human right, according to a declaration issued by the General Assembly of the United Nations (UN), since it responds to the guarantee of life and health of the population. In addition, the task of ensuring the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all was one of the objectives of sustainable development (ODS 6) established for 2030. The challenge of achieving this goal in little more than one Decade will require an extraordinary effort by the countries, multilateral institutions involved with the theme and society in general. In order to do so, it is necessary to explore new ways of overcoming existing obstacles, be they technical, financial, institutional arrangements and forms of cooperation between countries.

People - 1st Discussion Feb - Apr 2017

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The 8th World Water Forum will have Water and People as one of its central themes, focusing on access to water, sanitation in all its aspects, and water and health issues. In order to reach that, three topics have been set to comprise the debate questions under People. The following topics should split into Thematic Sessions and other debate stages during the 8th World Water Forum in 2018:

  1. Enough safe water for all
  2. Integrated sanitation for all
  3. Water and public health

Considering the above topics about People – Water Sanitation and Health:      

  1. What are the major challenges under each topic that concern civil society and communities and need to be raised for debate during the 8th World Water Forum?
  2. How those challenges apply to problems in your city, community or neighbouring surroundings?

Your feedback is going to support the organisation instances of the Forum in the definition of Thematic Sessions and other opportunities for debate during the event.

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Carlos Carrión-Crespo's picture

Carlos Carrión-... said:

The targets for SDG 6 share strong linkages with the world of work.  For example, access to WASH in the workplace would go a long way towards universal access, since rural and urban workplaces have the potential of reaching a majority of the adult population and can help disseminate good practices.   In order to strengthen these linkages, the WASH4Work initiative was launched on World Water Day 2016 ("Water and Jobs") and the ILO launched on World Toilet Day 2016 the self-training handbook "WASH@Work".  The handbook can be seen in the following link: http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---ed_dialogue/---sector/documen....

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva said:

Dear Water Colleagues,
This is a humble attempt for a brief summary on the action in e-room PEOPLE during the 1st week.
The e-room PEOPLE started operating immediately after the official launch of Your Voice campaign and gains power in a very smooth and consistent way. Congratulations for everyone who in one way or another contributed to this success!
Actually, the main pushers and pullers in our e-room represent various stakeholders from various parts of the world – active citizens, water and health professionals, lawyers, etc., working at various levels – grassroots, community, national and international. We still need to make an attempt to involve more people around us, but also representatives of water and sanitation service providers and decision-makers with policy/political profile.
The attention of our e-room contributors focused on a very broad aspect of issues: water and health, water quality, efficiency of wastewater treatment, equitable access to services for groups of the population with specific needs, school sanitation, gender and water, toilets and safety, capacity building for professionals as well as water users, new technologies, etc.
Most of these subjects need a deeper elaboration to convince the Forum Secretariat that at least one of the 100 Forum sessions had to be devoted to them! And there are definitely aspects that deserve attention but have not been touched yet.
It has been a privilege for me to act as a lead moderator of this 1st week! Thank you all for the excellent work!

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

@ Diana,

It was my pleasure interacting with you and the rest on this very important topic!

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva said:

Dear Water Colleagues,
This is a humble attempt for a brief summary on the action in e-room PEOPLE during the 1st week.
The e-room PEOPLE started operating immediately after the official launch of Your Voice campaign and gains power in a very smooth and consistent way. Congratulations for everyone who in one way or another contributed to this success!
Actually, the main pushers and pullers in our e-room represent various stakeholders from various parts of the world – active citizens, water and health professionals, lawyers, etc., working at various levels – grassroots, community, national and international. We still need to make an attempt to involve more people around us, but also representatives of water and sanitation service providers and decision-makers with policy/political profile.
The attention of our e-room contributors focused on a very broad aspect of issues: water and health, water quality, efficiency of wastewater treatment, equitable access to services for groups of the population with specific needs, school sanitation, gender and water, toilets and safety, capacity building for professionals as well as water users, new technologies, etc.
Most of these subjects need a deeper elaboration to convince the Forum Secretariat that at least one of the 100 Forum sessions had to be devoted to them! And there are definitely aspects that deserve attention but have not been touched yet.
It has been a privilege for me to act as a lead moderator of this 1st week! Thank you all for the excellent work!

Priscilla Usiobaifo's picture

Priscilla Usiobaifo said:

As a matter of urgency, young people in Nigeria must put the discourse on water on the agenda.

It's erroneously believed that water is a private issue but it is a public issue. I grew up with running taps in my community but as the years pass by, the government failed in its responsibility to its people.

Water is a basic amenity that must be provided as a priority need to citizens.

The sad reality in Nigeria, is few political office holders sinking boreholes for villages. In most cases, the boreholes lack sustainability. In my LGA of origin, we have a dam (OJIRAMI DAM). I need the Nigerian government to resuscitate this dam. A functional dam has far more economic benefits than the current politics of borehole creation.

Hassan Aboelnga's picture

Hassan Aboelnga replied:

Thanks so much Priscilla for your input. I am totally convinced that young people play a great role in boosting water sector especially in Africa (Nigeria). could you share with us some experiences about the main challenges  that youth face to be engaged in WASH sector?.   

Priscilla Usiobaifo's picture

Priscilla Usiobaifo said:

I live and work in a rural community in Edo State, Nigeria.

Access to safe water is a matter of survival and the importance of water can never be overemphasised.

Unfortunately, violence against girls is pervasive in my community. In most of the communities in Edo State, the girl child is saddled with the responsibility of providing water for the household.

In many occasions, these girls encounter risks in the process. Some are forced to skip school in order to fetch water while several others are sexually harassed and violated.

Water is an essential tool for strengthening the community health care system. In Nigeria, the Primary Health Centres are strategically situated at the community levels. Access to Water will play a major role in preventing most of the illnesses presented at these facilities.

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Priscilla,

You are raising an issue with enormous importance. Actally, there are well documented surveys proving that women and girls invest enormous amount of their time fetching water - about 200 million hours every day globally!!! One of the reports for example: https://www.unilever.com/Images/slp_water-for-women-march-2015_tcm244-42...

And still, documented failures like this do not lead to effective national policies!

Though, it is well known that many women all over the world are being sexually harassed while fetching water or using unsafe sanitation facilities, I have not seen a well documented research about this ugly fact. Do you happen to know about such surveys? Could we pursue a session about this issue during the 8th World Water Forum?

Majid Turmusani's picture

Majid Turmusani said:

Disability is a cross-cutting issue and pertinent to all themes of discussion in the forum. Persons with Disabilities (PwDs) are likely to experience lack of access to safe water and sanitation and they are particularly vulnerable in emergency and humanitarian situations. Lack of hygiene could create and perpetuate impairments and disabilities (i.e. blindness being caused by poor hygiene and sanitation). Although recent years have witnessed improvement in WASH programs across the globe, it’s important that such programs continue to focus on the needs of PwDs, namely in terms of accessibility standards and gender friendly, in line with article 28 of CRPD.

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Majid, your intervention is most welcome referring to Ar. 28 of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Will you, please, propose some session topics for the agenda of the 8th World Water Forum reflecting the issue of equitable access for groups of people with specific needs?

Jean-Pierre Tamisier's picture

Jean-Pierre Tamisier said:

Hello everyone,

A plea for the effective recognition of the right to safe water.

This topic also matches with the Development discussion group.

The problem of the sovereign and exclusive competence of local authorities and the implementation of access to water:

Feedback:

In spite of considerable progress in the current conciliation process for gradual implementation of the right to water for all (2004-2017), much governmental involvement in the matter, the strong and enduring commitments on the part of all stakeholders in the water cause, the funding available for drinking water supply systems, ascertained water resources in the territories and all the conditions now met to finalise the solution/conciliation, no legal provisions have yet been made to compel local authorities to establish the right of access to water.

By their constitutional prerogatives, administrative freedom and exclusive rights to water management, local authorities have governance over the provision of water resources, distribution and connection under the sovereignty of their executive bodies.

The water resources of these authorities remain in this instance within the scope of territorial sovereignty. If there is no commitment by local executive bodies in this respect, water is hence a vital element that is legally inaccessible. In the model described, the insecurity related to basic needs of access to water (development projects, water supply demands) becomes a conflictual problem which cannot be resolved.

A number of governments have no constitutional capacity to intervene.

How governments can face with the urgency of new environmental issues? (Cop 21…)

Good practices: Stakeholder engagement:

Stakeholder engagement holds specific importance in water because this is a highly decentralized and fragmented sector, with multiple, interdependent players at different levels of government.

Stakeholder involvement provides an opportunity to be part of the solution, share views and priorities, and help prevent or resolve conflicts over water use. Several barriers hinder stakeholder participation in the field. The most frequently identified challenges include the lack of clarity on the intended use of stakeholder inputs in the decision-making and implementation process, the lack of local political will as the repository of the ultimate decision-making, weak legal frameworks (ref: OECD).

Solution:

The proposed solution is replicable on a large scale to all governments committed to the implementation of the right to water.

By transposing the right to water into law, or constitution, making it effective and enforceable or the creation of a conciliation proceeding, open to the stakeholder and under government control, would usefully complement the effective implementation of the human right to drinking water. The final obstacles would be removed and an end put to a chaotic situation regarding both water and law for which no answer has yet been found. If this solution were validated, it would be of considerable advantage to local authorities, an incentive for politicians to take a more positive attitude to a new water policy for the benefit of the majority and obviate for good the constant dysfunction in the use of this resource where exclusion would no longer be the rule.

Lack of access to water generates different types of conflict in almost every region of the world. The benefits of good governance are a guarantee of peace and development for all countries concerned and fairness for societies in general.

The 8th World Water Forum could be a relevant framework to deepen this issue and contribute to the advancement of this reflection for universal access to water.

My best regards for all

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Thank you for your valuable contribution, Jeun-Pierre!

And for making a link with the disscussion in the other e-rooms. I fully agree that water and sanitation is very often the entry point to sustainable development, and sustinable water policy and services is a compulsory component of sustainable development. Adaptation to climate change would be impossible if water policy and management are not adequately involved. Peace process is closely linked to safe water services and transboundary cooperation.

Would you advise what could be the sessions during the 8th that would address all these interactions?

KIRIT PARMAR's picture

KIRIT PARMAR said:

Respected All,

Water is available but religiously India’s untouchables are denied to access to public water i.e lake, pond and public water distribution centre. One of religious norms is if any untouchable touches to public water for any reason e.g. if even he/she is thirsty  and takes water to drink then also religiously entire water gets polluted.  And because of the water, many many untouchables (know as scheduled castes) have been victims of barbaric humiliation and discrimination practices since centuries. Large numbers of untouchables are socially boycotted form villages and they are living their life like refugees in their own country.

Yes, water quality and quantity both are getting deteriorated day by day, it is world concern but on other side, it is fact that people are denied to access to water. 

Hassan Aboelnga's picture

Hassan Aboelnga replied:

Dear Kirit , thank you for your contribution.  could you please share with us what is the main reason for water quality deterioration? I know that arsenic is a big issue in India which is naturally present at high level in ground water!

Moreover,  is it only in rural areas or it could be extended to big cities? 

KIRIT PARMAR's picture

KIRIT PARMAR replied:

Dear Hassan

In villages, the green revolution is one of causes in India which have reduced quality and quantity of water.  High uses of pesticides and fertilizers have contaminated soil, crops simultaneously ground table water. Excessive uses of ground table water for all reasons have also reduced quantity of ground table water. Deforestation followed by hazardous bioengineered agricultural productions and industrializations have effected water irreversibly.    

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Kirit,

Thank you for raising a painful issue like this one!

Do you have some suggestion how a global forum like the 8th World Water Forum could assist such groups of people?

KIRIT PARMAR's picture

KIRIT PARMAR replied:

Dear Diana,

Thanks for your motivating reply,

Honest implementation of the UN treaty bodies on human rights. Secularly implementation of India’s constitution articles dedicated to fundamental rights, these will be helpful  to untouchables to reduce their struggles for survival. Else only one option which I see as untouchable, boycotted  untouchables must be given international refugee status so that they could escape from barbaric untouchability practices and live their life as human.

Pedro P G Porto's picture

Pedro P G Porto said:

There is a small town that its water captation sistem is right next to a large old plantation. In this very city number of people with cancer seems to be above the average. Both facts could have some kind of link due to the pesticide usage on the plantation. Doing a quick research in the scientific literature there was neither evidence to prove the link nor to disprove it. Could the World Water Forum have something to help on this behalf?

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

undertaking research on pesticide contamination of water sources and linking that to the increase in cancer requires specialised efforts in environmental and human health risk assessment. This is because, the hydrophobic nature of pesticides makes it possible to be sorbed to the colloidal particles/sediments. also that pesticides may undergoe photodegradation while in water. Therefore, it may be important considering taking your samples more frequently for the whole year to quantify the trends in pesticide concentrations in water sources (more especially surface water) downstream the plantation, as well as treated water.

So you many need to do a long term research to testing your hypothesis! 

Pedro P G Porto's picture

Pedro P G Porto replied:

In fact, I intend to do my masters degree research on this area. I am looking for new ideas on how to approach this subject. Thank you for your input, I will definitely consider all of it.

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Pedro,

Actually that should be the reason for existence of global fora like the World Water Fora. I believe, you can use this e-platform to mobilize different stakeholders from different parts of the world who share a similar problem to share lessons and look for solutions together. Maybe this would lead to a joint session during the Forum and joint project implementation in the future!

Pedro P G Porto's picture

Pedro P G Porto replied:

I am looking forward to see how people deal with this subject around the world. I would like to see if this kind of question has some relevance anyelsewhere. Any support would be helpful in order to gatherer knowledge to clarify this point. 

Barbara Dunin's picture

Barbara Dunin said:

Olá,

Muito interessante conhecer desafios e soluções envolvendo água e saneamento em outros países do mundo. Espero que este espaço seja útil para que todos possamos aprender mais sobre o tema e trocar conhecimento. Espero também ver contribuições brasileiras :)

Abraços

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Hi Barbara!

You are most welcome!

I am just using the chance to explain that we can share and discuss on this page in various languages using the Google translation tool.

To facilitate the translation, this website offers direct link to Google translator just at the top of the page at the top left, above the sign 8th World Water Forum. The aumomatic translation between English and Portugues is quite reasonable. Please, be aware that it is not always the case with every language. Sorry! With my native Bulgarian language, for example, it does not work.

Barbara Dunin's picture

Barbara Dunin replied:

Hey Diana, thank you for that!

F H Mughal's picture

F H Mughal said:

My over 40 years' of experience in the field of water, sanitation and hygiene shows a number of challenges. Lack of political will is a major challenge.  It is difficult to achieve significant progress, in absence of political will.

Financial constraint is a frequently-cited challenge. Even if funds are available, there are no funds for the operation and maintenance of the project. An associated factor is the financial transparency.

Technical expertise in the field of WASH is very low.  As such, the projects are not properly designed. An example is the setting up of settling ponds, with infrequent chlorination, which constitute a full rural water treatment system in the rural areas. How can this be a full-fledged water treatment system, expecially when raw water turbidities are more than 50 ntu?

International agencies, donors or otherwise, can  do a lot to change the situation, provided they show trheir committment.

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

Dear Mughal,,

Just to respond to your question of rural water treatment plant with 50 NTU,,The best way would be to coagulate your raw water with Alluminium Sulphate/Iron Chloride followed by flocculation then filtration after which you can do chlorination!

Otherwise, If you just chlroine this type water with that high turbidity, then you will promote the formation chlorine by-products like Trihalomethanes (THMs) and Mutagen - X (MXs) which are carcinogenic, thereby endagering the health of the communities using that water source.

F H Mughal's picture

F H Mughal replied:

Dear Evans,

Thank you for your useful suggestion. Would it be more helpful, if roughing filters are used, in place of coagulation, to reduce the raw water turbidities?

Regards,

F H Mughal

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

@ Maghal,, you are welcome... using ordinary filters to removal colloidal particles (particle size 0.1 - 1 nm) maybe quite diffcult,,unless you use Micro/Ultra Filtration technogies which are quite expensive intallations compared to my earlier suggestion!

The problem is that these colloidal particles have a negative charge on their surfaces,,hence better removed by chemical means (a positive charge from Al / Fe is used to neutralise the negative charge).

F H Mughal's picture

F H Mughal replied:

Dear Evans,

Thank you for your useful response. I agree with your point of view.

Regards,

F H Mughal

Beatriz Martins Carneiro's picture

Beatriz Martins... replied:

Welcome Mr. Mughal, and thank you very much for your contribution.

WASH expertize and political will are important barriers, no doubt. Can you tell us more about how Pakistan is dealing with those challenges? How the cities or the countryside are being affected?

Also, do you see any solution that can be replicated in other regions?

F H Mughal's picture

F H Mughal replied:

Dear Beatriz,

Water and sanitation scenario in Pakistan is not upto the mark, due to absence of initiatives by the politicians and government functionaries. Karachi is a megacity. A recent news reveals that 60 per cent of the Karachi's population has no access to sewerage system. Due to untreated discharge of wastewater in the sea, it is felt that the seawater will not be suitable for desalination. Drinking water quality in almost all towns is not wholesome.

Committment  by international agencies (WB, ADB, UNEP, ESCAP, DFID, USAID, UNICEF, WaterAid) to improve the water and sanitation scenario can do a lot. They would be instrumental in sensitizing the government. This option can be replicated in South Asian cities.

Regards,

F H Mughal

SALAMATU GARBA's picture

SALAMATU GARBA said:

From my  various field experience, I noticed that policy makers and even people generally shy away from sanitation projects. Is it possible for the next sets of interventions to  focus more on policies and enforcing or implementing them to translate into action.

For instance in many of our third world countries, there are only few or close to none ( toilets),  in schools, clinics and public places such as markets and motor parks. Also I realise that some landlords build houses for rent with few toilets  and you find hundreds of tenants queuing up to use the toilets or bathrooms in the morning.  wouldnt we consider coming up with a "collective voice",  for action, which scale up our sanitation options and get policy commitments  into action. Just  my thoughts to mark any of the "WORLD TOILET DAY"

Beatriz Martins Carneiro's picture

Beatriz Martins... replied:

Thank you for your contribution Mrs Salamutu,

Sanitation is for sure an urgent issue that must be tackled globally and a collective action/voice could be an intelligent tool to promote awareness. Here in Brazil it is also a challenge very connected to poverty, health and inequality between our country regions. It is also a SDG (6) that impacts many others such as SDG3 and SDG 14 – and even SDG 5 once girls are more affected in places with no toilets available, such as schools.

Can you give us more details about the main sanitation challenges of your region? And how government, society and private sector relates to it?

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Beatriz,

Dear Salamatu,

Let me share with you the experience of my NGO Earth Forever in Bulgaria. Last year, we completed a survey that proved a direct link between unsafe school sanitation and early marriages - SDG 6 and SDG 5. For the Gypsy minority in Bulgaria (about 10% of the population), it is extremely important that the girl preserves her virginity until she gets married. The horrifying status of the school toilets (often outside the main building of the school; or in the best case in the most remote dark corner of the school building) is one of the leading reasons for the girls' families to stop their daughters from school; and the experience shows that in a year the girls would already be married - often at 11-12.

Beatriz Martins Carneiro's picture

Beatriz Martins... replied:

Olá Diana,

Obrigada por compartilhar este exemplo. Os ODS são integrados e interdependentes, e isso fica ainda mais claro quando falamos de um tema tão transversal como a água. É também muito interessante ver essa dinâmica quando abordamos aspectos culturais de cada região.

No Brasil, também há muitos problemas envolvendo o absenteísmo de crianças em escolas por falta de banheiros, ou banheiros em péssimas condições.

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... said:

Despite that most countries met the MDG target on water and sanitation, developing countires including Zambia were still off-truck of 2015! Our organisation has been involved in National WASH Advocacy and the lessons learnt were that; teh implimentation and monitoring of the MDG onsafe water focused more on having more improved water points without questioning the quality of water from such water points! There was a week link on accountability of government and other office bearer, and the role of civil organisations and community participation as not properly defined!For this reason, The Zambia NGO WASH Forum, ENVAROS and other Organisation embarked on a national budget monitoring and tracking from 2013-2015 to enhance the role of the communities in water governance and accountability! This was implimented based on Accessibility, Accountability, Acceptability and Quality (AAAQ) Framework of the Danish Human Rights. Moving forward with the water and sanitation SDGsENVAROS has invented a cocept called "Community Water Security and Sanitation Governance (CoWaSS) Intiative. The initiative seek to empower more community volunters in onsite water quality monitoring, water quality simulations in school, water governance and allow communities to engaging with policy makers in water security. So far, a partial pilot has proved that communities can be made more resilient to water insecurity by empowering them with necisary skills and knowledge to deal with their own probles, because we will not be there always to solve their problems! 

SALAMATU GARBA's picture

SALAMATU GARBA replied:

Thank you EvaN Tempo.

first the projects would have been designed to be people owned GET  their full participation in identifying the project locations and other needs.  Emphasis on water quality, linking it to preventable  water borne diseases would also need to take center stage in our next interventions.

Also,  one of our weak links is that media professionals are rarely taken along to bridge the gaps in their capacity needs to enable them  disseminative timely and relevant information through the media.

I am of the opinion that even government field workers particularly, those closer to the people have limited skills and material resources to help them track quality and progress of clean water and its management. We may need to  " watch our backs",  on the issues of  quantity of water points  and concentrate on quality and people owned projects realistically

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

Salamatu, you very right! media need to be trained to in understanding water and sanitation issues in the context SDGs which is normally lacking! The Office bearers in Government at times have inadequate capacity to carrying out water quality monitoring activities at District and lower levels.

In a quest to popularise, water quality aspects in Zambia we (ENVAROS) managed to a national training for the Ministry of Health for 30 Provincial Environmental Health Personel for the Ministry of Health (August 2016). This was followed by two seperate provincial trainings which focused on personel from districts. We hope to finish the trainings in the remaing 8 provinces by June 2018.

In this way, sustainability of the CoWaSS Initiative will be granteered coz even government officers responsible for onsite water quality monitoring are being trained on request by The Ministry of Health. 

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Great work, Mr. Evans! Congratulations!

Please, will it be possible to elaborate more on the smooth continuation of the efforts on the implementation of the MDGs towards the implementation of SDGs and Agenda 2030 in Zambia. Are you optimistic that the capacity built on MDGs is a solid foundation for accomplishing better of the SDGs?

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

Diana, we really managed to build the momentum even as a consortium of organisations under the umbrella of the Zambia NGO WASH Forum for water and sanitation advocacy (where I also served as a Vice Chairperson - Lobbying and Advocacy Permanent Committee). We also went as far as having our voices heard under the SWA (Sanita and Water for all) keeep the promise Campaign. We have seen government departments becoming more transparent and accountable because we were permited to to have access to government documents like budgets, work plans, progress reports etc!

In the SDG era, its quite too early to say that Developing countries will meet the SDG target 2030. This can only be done if the following measures are implimted;

i. countries should translate their water and sanitation SDG targets into yearly or 2 yr target and be monitored on short term basis, unlike waitng for 2030 to come!

ii. Multinational donors should consider supporting civil society to monitor the implimentation of SDGs,, coz Government can not monitor itsself on the progress made.

iii. there is need for countries to come-up with a national clear roadmap and implimentation plans for for water and sanitation for all SDGs!

iv. the is need for multinational coperating partners to promoting innovative community driven initiatives, as opposed to imposing global initiatives which may not apply every bearing in mind culture differences!

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Evans,

Thank you for the elaborated answer! Yes, all these are absolutely necessary to have a smooth and successful implementation process towards Agenda 2030 and the SDGs.

Do you think the CSOs can also play a role as promoters of sustainable technologies and higher quality standards fro example; and if so how do you think these type of projects would be funded.

laura emilce flores rodriguez's picture

laura emilce fl... said:

I think that first We have to do like human been is to learn how to use water, second how to use and to get safe water, third, a work with all agencies governmental and not governmetal not to contaminated water. This es very important, because each action of human using a lot of chemicals (houses.work, recreation) contaminates the water. We need to work together in all these issues. 

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Welcome Laura!

It is obvious that you have thought a lot about wise and responsible use and protection of water. Will you introduce the projects you are involved into, people you are working with, etc. This kind of info will be useful for all of us.

Eltigani Abdelgalil's picture

Eltigani Abdelgalil said:

It is essential that the water which people drink and use for other purposes should be clean and free of germs and chemicals. Disease-causing germs and chemicals can find their way into water supplies, and when this happens the water becomes polluted or contaminated and when people drink it or come in contact with, they can contract serious disease. poor water quality will continue to be a major risk factor for public health among the population particularly rural communities.I think easy, hand-able and immediate check tools is very important to make sure that people drink safe water  

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Mr Abdelgalil,

I cannot agree more with your position!

In Bulgaria where I live, the drinking water quality supplied to the cities is quite high but the rural communities lag behind. One is not really sure whether the drinking water would always be safe.

Please, will you share your experience with the immediate check tools?

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

@ Diana, In Zambia ENVAROS NGO has devised a simplified methodology in which community volunteers are trained in onsite water quality monitoring coupled with the intepretation of  water quality data! in this way, communities are capable of acertaining the potential of their drinking water to causing water-borne diseases or not! Water parameters of focus include critical physio-chemical and bacteriological aspects. 

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Dear Evans,

Thanks immensely for your contribution. You have done great work!

Please, can you share links to training events, methodology materials, etc., that will assist others who are still looking for a solution that fits their needs.

Evans Tembo (MPH, MSc, Env.Eng)'s picture

Evans Tembo (MP... replied:

You are welcome!

The website is still being developed,,, (www.envaros.com)..as the CoWaSS Initiative is an infancy approach which has proved to work..we may olny be able to share some reports/training manuals to organisations/persons interested in this concept via email. an also that such interested persons should acknowledge that they will not use for profit making! I should also mention that the success of the Initiative entirely depends on how well the facilitator is able to take community volunteer into a transformative process by empowering them with necisary simplified water quality and water governance information. Using the THREE SO WHAT Questions... (So What is happening, So What does this mean to me,,,and So What can I do,,,approach). If its will be possible, ENVAROS will come and share a full methodology during the 8th WWF.....my email is envaros@yahoo.com or envaros@gmail.com

Diana Iskreva's picture

Diana Iskreva replied:

Thank you for sharing your contact information, Evans! I believe, many people will contact you now to benefit from your generous proposal to share detailed infromation about your experience :-). I will.

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